A little bit of kindness

Reza Marvasti

With so many horrible things happening in the world right now, I find myself wondering why. What is the fundamental issue within some humans that allows them to behave in such ways? How can anyone possibly think that killing innocent people, innocent children is ok? Why do human beings do this to each other? My heart feels heavy and a familiar dull ache sets in. Back in August, I saw a photo of a Syrian man holding his baby who was just a few months old. They had just arrived by boat to a new country where they would be living in a refugee camp. This picture is the reason that I am here today. As I looked at the photograph, I wondered what kind of life this child would have. I wondered about the sadness and the anger that might grow in his little heart. I wondered if he would ever have a normal childhood full of love, laughter and of course play. Maybe he would. But it made me think of all the other millions of innocent children around the world that wouldn’t, because of war or poverty. Children are ours to take care of. They are our responsibility – the little seeds of our planet. How they are grown up will one day be reflected in how they shape our world.

The child in the main photo of this blog is Deepak. He was the greatest helper at the last playground, so eager to learn and get things done. He picked us chah toot (berries) and was always bringing us water. Deepak is a kind, sweet soul.

 

In a world that is currently so filled with violence and sadness, we can still choose love. We can all do something about this. We can choose to be kind to one another, and to ourselves. Be kind to strangers, be kind to your family. Be especially kind to those that cannot be kind in return, for they are the ones that need it the most. We see enough anger and hatred on the news. We don’t need anymore of it in our daily lives. Choose kindness and love, always.

We are currently working on the 6th playground of 50. So, nearly 12% done! The kids love to help with the painting especially. At the last school, once we had finished with painting the playground and it was time to clean up, they decided they weren’t done yet. They started painting their school – the brick wall and the concrete floor. I thought this was hilarious. Some people (the principal) didn’t. Building playgrounds here in India is much different than our experience in Uganda. The materials are a lot easier to come by here. Some days the workers don’t show up, and sometimes they do. The language barrier has proven to be the biggest challenge. But no matter what, the children are always so excited when the team first arrives and brings the materials in. That is something we can always count on. 

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